London Tavern (Beaufort)

From Hotels of Ballarat
For other hotels with the same or similar names see London Tavern.
London Tavern
Picture needed
History
Town Beaufort
Street Neill Street
Known dates 1865-1869
Demolished Destroyed by fire, 11 October 1869

The London Tavern was a hotel in Beaufort, Victoria, <1865-1869.

Site[edit | edit source]

The hotel was in Neill Street, Beaufort.[1] Neill Street is the main street, and part of the Western Highway.

Background[edit | edit source]

History[edit | edit source]

In February 1865 a man named Reid, and working for a contractor named Cameron, had his leg broken by his horse. He had been trying to take the horse to water when it reared up and trampled on him while he tried to remount. He was taken to the hotel for medical treatment.[2]

An old Beaufort resident, Francis Hugh Goldicutt, known as "Frank the Painter" died at the hotel on 15 August 1867. Frank had been suffering from a chronic lung affliction, not helped by his irregular habits.[3]

The hotel was destroyed in a fire on Monday 11 October 1869:

ON Monday morning, a fire broke out in a large wooden building in Neill street, Beaufort, owned by James Gilloch, and known as the London Tavern. As Beaufort has neither a water supply nor a fire brigade, very little could be done to stay the progress of the fire. The London Tavern was insured for £300 with the Northern Company. The origin of the disaster is at present a mystery. Most of the townsmen were active in rendering what assistance they could, and ultimately succeeded in saving not only Mr. Gunn's house and store, but also a large wooden stable of Mr. Gilloch's.[1]

FIRE AT BEAUFORT. — On Monday morning, about 2 o'clock, a fire broke out in a large wooden building in Neill street, Beaufort, owned by James Gilloch, and known as the London Tavern. The flames spread rapidly, and as Beaufort has neither a water supply nor a fire brigade, very little could be done to stay the progress of the fire, and in an hour's time the place was levelled to the ground. Mr William Gunn's store (the adjoining building) was saved with very great difficulty, a circumstance that was materially contributed to by a double brick wall, next to the burning house. Fortunately, too, there was no wind, or nothing could have saved the store, which contains a large and valuable stock, not nearly covered by insurance. The London Tavern was insured for £300, I believe with the Northern Company. At the time the fire broke out Mr Gilloch and his family were on the premises, but the origin of the disaster is at present a mystery. Most of the townsmen were active in rendering what assistance they could, and ultimately succeeded in saving not only Mr Gunn's house and store, but also a large wooden stable of Mr Gilloch's, which, though on fire at one end, was saved by the application of water and partial pulling down.[4]

Community Involvement[edit | edit source]

The People[edit | edit source]

  • In August 1867 the publican was James P. Gilloch.[3]
    • He still held the license at the time of the fire in October 1869 the [1]


See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1869 'COUNTRY NEWS.', Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954), 16 October, p. 13. , viewed 18 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article169268541
  2. 1865 'NEWS AND NOTES.', The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), 16 February, p. 2. , viewed 18 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article112884799
  3. 3.0 3.1 1867 'COUNTRY NEWS.', The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), 20 August, p. 6. , viewed 18 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article185505438
  4. 1869 'No title', The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), 12 October, p. 2. , viewed 18 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article244910722


External Links[edit | edit source]